Good Luck, Kid: Joseph Interview

Portland-bred sister trio Joseph are getting ready to release their latest album, ‘Good Luck, Kid’ which comes out on the 13th September. I had a chat Natalie from the group about it, touring in the UK and more. Their lead single for the album was ‘Fighter’ – I started off by asking why they chose that as their first taste from the album, and then their inspiration behind the track.
“Fighter takes us from hushed intimate moments to explosive sonic heights.”
“Meegan’s voice soars. It’s an exciting song to us in that regard and it also is really special because it came from a personal story. When I just want to check out from the world and its problems this song asks me to stay in the fight. We wanted to lead the album out with that invitation. “
“Fighter came from a moment between the three of us where we had to decide to keep going. “
“In any relationship you can slowly slip away – not bring your real feelings and self to the table – or you can say the hard thing and work through it to stay connected. That is what happened to us. “
I asked Natalie if the group had any favourite songs on the album, and if the album has a specific sound; if the singles they had released so far were similar to the rest of the project.
“My absolute favourite song on the album is Room For You because it encapsulates everything I wish for the audience and for everyone on this planet.”
“Right this second though, I’ll say Presence because I’ve been practising the guitar riff and it’s going to feel SO good to play it through a loud PA. Half Truths is a standout to me because I have watched Allie do amazing work overcoming anxiety and this song captures that so well. “
“And also Revolving Door is a heart-wrencher. A very brave song for Meegan to write. I love this album, wow. “
“Every song on this album is totally different and has different tones and textures but what this song does say about the rest of the album is that the dynamics are vast.”
“The album is about getting into the driver’s seat of your life and each song is part of that journey. We’re so excited for it to come out!”

The band are touring in the UK later this year, I asked Natalie what their experience has been like over here in the past.

 “We adore the UK. Adore it! Everyone there has been very good to us.”
“We’ve made so many good British friends over the years from touring with James Bay and Michael Kiwanuka, and from playing festivals like Barn on the Farm and British Summer time that the UK is very dear to us.”
“Maybe part of that is because the Pacific Northwest shares a very similar climate so it feels a lot like home, but more exciting because everyone has an accent! Also, every time we go to London someone recommends Dishoom and this upcoming tour is our chance to finally try it!”

 

Joseph’s album ‘Good Luck, Kid’ is out on the 13th September via ATO records. Check them out on Twitter here.

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Tessa Violet Interview

Tessa Violet is set to release her debut album later this year, and I spoke to her about the album, the visuals that go along with it, and starting out as an online creator.

 


I started off by asking how she felt about the reception to her latest EP, and why decide to release the project as separate EPs initially.


“I’m feeling good! it’s a repackaging of the first three singles plus three remixes.”


“We’ve actually decided to release the whole album this fall!! stoked on that. “


“I wrote the album as an album, you take something different and more complete when you listen to it all together. Initially we’d considered the idea of three EPs just because i am still a relatively new artist and there wasn’t much demand, but things have taken off a bit this year! I cried happy tears when we made the call.”


Tessa’s single ‘I Like (The Idea Of) You’ is my favourite track from her to date, and features on her latest EP. I asked her what the inspiration behind the track was.


“Just as the song says, there was a guy who i knew i wasn’t a fit for but loved the idea of him, and not just that but i enjoyed the whole experience of falling for the idea of someone.”


“I felt powerful.”


The visuals for the Bad Ideas campaign have all been really striking and memorable, especially the Crush video. I asked Tessa what was the process behind working on that video was like, & how important are visual aspects like videos and album/single art to her.



“It was my director Isaac White’s idea to film in a supermarket, mine to use the boomerang technique, and the execution of the brilliant editor Shawna Howson who brought it together.”


“That video was incredibly DIY, a group of passionate people coming together to make something because we all cared about it. I think with everything I do, visuals or otherwise. it’s important to me that it all be “right”.”


” I don’t think of myself as a perfectionist, but I do have a strong sense of what works or doesn’t for me and I do everything I can to follow my gut there.”


Tessa started out by uploading videos to Youtube, and building her audience organically that way. I asked her why she thinks so many people still don’t take musicians who started their careers online seriously.


“I think it’s a variety of factors. There’s definitely a stigma around people who built something online.”


“Maybe because when you go through a label, there’s so much money going in to it from so many different places you know it’s going to reach some level of par or good, but online anyone can upload anything.”


“for years i’d have people saying to me “yeah i don’t mean this in a bad way but it surprised me, your songs are actually really good!” whatever it is, i try not to put too much energy in to getting distracted by it.”


“I think if if the music is great then people who like it will like. that’s something to be grateful for.”

Say Hello To: Before Breakfast

Before Breakfast are Gina, Lucy, Debra, Annie from Sheffield. I asked them a few questions about their band, favourite venue & more.

Where did your band name come from?
“Depends what mood we’re in as we’ve got a variety of stories, but the truth is it’s a race horse name. Let’s hope it was a successful horse.”

Is there a favourite venue of yours in your hometown and why do you like it?
“Sheffield isn’t as easy to gig in as people may think, well for us, anyway.  If you’re a white male indie guitar band it seems pretty easy. ”

“But a venue that’s doing great work in folk, country, Americana, jazz and more is The Greystones, their books are so busy for months in advance and it’s easy to see why touring artists try to get into this venue.”

“It seems to have a dedicated audience, regardless of what the music is. But my actual fave venue is what The Walkabout building never was. Sad.”

What is your favourite gig you have played so far?
“A massive question! Recently we were very luck to support C Duncan on his Spring headline tour and the show at Edinburgh Summerhall was so lovely. ”

“The majority of his audience came down early to see us perform, they laughed at our jokes and bought our merch, the staff were so welcoming and the building itself is brimming with history and character.”

If you had to describe your own sound, how would you put it?
“There’s a sweetness in the vocal harmonies and sweeping melodies but combined with the occasional discomfort in the lyrics and visual performance, we’re hoping it will leave you nicely tense. ”

“Though I nicked that from a mate, it’s not a bad summary. It’s how I’d like people to feel during a gig”

Which act would you love to support
“Villagers. That man’s music has pierced my very soul and he now owes me for the damage incurred.”

Check Before Breakfast out on Twitter here, and find them on Spotify below.

Nikita Bassi Interview

Nikita Bassi is a UK based artist who just dropped her (really great) debut single, ‘Satin’ I caught up with her to chat about the meaning behind it, playing live & more! I started off by asking her what ‘Satin’ meant to her.

“I was playing around with different production ideas and had been trying to find my sound for a while, so I recognised that something felt different the day I started on Satin.”

“I felt like I needed to keep going down that worldly path and did so, so it’s a special song to me. It’s basically a reflection of what was inside my head when I imagined being in love. It happened to me a bit later in life than people around me so I was always curious.”

Nikita is UK based and has Punjabi-Indian roots and this blend of cultures shines through on ‘Satin’. I asked her how she would describe her own sound.

“When I’m writing now, I play around with a lot of different elements and dive into different genres without really overthinking it. There’s always a Worldly vibe in there – So I’d say my sound is just a little celebration of diversity.”

Despite having just released her first single, Nikita has played live all over the world. I asked her a few quick fire questions about playing live:

What is your favourite gig that you have played so far?

“I played at The Mint in LA a few months ago. I was there on holiday and had just emailed them asking if I could do a little set, so they put me on stage before these amazing blues bands. It was just a really chilled and unexpected night.”

Is there a favourite venue of yours in your hometown and why do you like it?

“The Actress and Bishop. I’d love to play there again as the last time I did it, I was 15 and was SO nervous. I looked like I was going to cry. I actually found a video of it on my old laptop yesterday and I was cringing so much!”

Which act would you love to support?
“Nelly Furtado because she’s incredible and I’ve been singing her songs in my bedroom since I was about 6 – they’re total anthems in my life.”

You can check out Nikita on twitter here.

Dead Nature Interview

I spoke to Tarek Musa, ex-Spring King front man & drummer, about his new project ‘Dead Nature’ and what life is like solo. We kicked things off by discussing why he chose that name for his solo project.


“The phrase Dead Nature (which literally translates from the word ‘Still Life’) struck a chord with me. It represents a time in my life where it felt as if time stood still, and not much was going on.”


“A lot of the songs I have written for this project already touch on the subject of loneliness, self-reflection and space. It had an emotional response that I took something from.”


The first Dead Nature EP, ‘Taking My Shadow’ released back in July to a great reception, but Tarek isn’t rushing to make a full-length project, but there will be one in the future.


“I’m writing a lot of music for the project and with time it’s only going to grow further. “


“Part of the process for me is in taking time to enjoy the natural growth of the music whilst creating in an inspiring environment. There will be an album at some point.”


‘Rookwood’ is my favourite from the debut EP from Dead Nature, so I asked Tarek about the inspiration behind that track.


“‘Rookwood’ represents a time in my life that was filled with highs and lows. It captures a time of complete stillness that I hope listeners can relate to in their own way.”


“I wrote the track to help explore old feelings from over fifteen years ago, and what came out of it is some of my proudest work.”


As well as making music himself, Tarek has been producing and engineering for the likes of Circa Waves and The Big Moon;


“When I work with other artists, helping to produce their music, I feel I have a level of understanding with how they may be feeling in the studio. “


“I’m lucky to have experience on both sides, which really helps in making a band or artist feel comfortable when i’m working with them.”


“It’s different in the sense that when I work on my own songs I know exactly what I want them to sound like. Getting to the sound I have in my head is a lot easier to achieve, it’s instantaneous.”


“Producing for others has given me a huge respect for the struggle of artists, and a reminder to myself that what we do as musicians, producers, songwriters and artists is not achieved over night. “


“There is so much time and effort put into what people hear, and sometimes it’s good to remind ourselves of the amount of dedication it takes to get a finished song over the line.”


You can listen to the debut Dead Nature EP below.

 

 

Perfect Sound Whatever: James Acaster Interview

James Acaster is one of the biggest comedians in the world at the moment, and coming off the back of constantly sold out tour dates and his universally acclaimed Netflix specials, James has written a book focused on music that released in 2016.

I chatted to him about why he wrote about 2016 specifically, and the music he encountered along the way. Three instant classics from 2016 got him started on his journey, after a long period of not really engaging with new releases.

“During 2016 I got into three big albums – Blackstar by David Bowie, Lemonade by Beyoncé and Blonde by Frank Ocean, after a decade of engaging with very little modern day music.”

“It got me excited about pop music and at the end of 2016 I really enjoyed reading the end of year lists on all the music websites. In January 2017 I launched into my own personal breakdown and so I did the thing that’d most recently bought me joy in order to cope and continued to read the 2016 end of year lists and buy the albums from it. I just kept going until I felt better. It took about two years.”

Finding every album worth listening to released in 2016 sounds like a daunting task. I asked James how he went about even beginning to find them all.

“Online Lists, YouTube vlogs, Pitchfork, Bandcamp, Word of mouth, Googling musicians I liked on the off chance they had a 2016 project.”

“Some bands even contacted me when they found out about the project. Just every means necessary really.”

Listening to that much music must uncover a few hidden gems, so I asked James what some underrated albums he had discovered are:

“There are so many. I think Badd Timing by The Sooper Swag Project sounds like no other rap album ever and Pixvae by Pixvae sounds like no other rock album ever. But I could give you a very long list of Overlooked Masterpieces From 2016.”

As well as these albums that James feels are underrated, when trawling upon hundreds of recommendations and listicles there must be some albums on the other end of the scale:

“Loads of people were recommending Moenai Hai by The Gerogerigegege. I think it was a prank.”

“It’s just a bunch of nothing-y background sound then one kind of song then more nothingness. It really wound me up because I had to go so far out of my way to obtain a copy. I bet I’ll try and get into it again one day though.”

I had a listen to it, and I agree.

‘Perfect Sound Whatever’ is out on the 22nd August and you can pre-order it here. It contains a story about James shitting his pants.

 

 

‘A Healthy Earth’:Peaer Interview

I spoke to Peter from very good Brooklyn based indie band Peaer, about their imminently releasing second album ‘A Healthy Earth’, due out on the 16th of August. Here’s what he had to say.

First of all, I asked why they went with that title for the album.
“We went through a lot of titles when we were trying to finish this album and nothing seemed to really stick. “We wanted to imply on the concept of “scale” with the title, since the subject matter of the record goes between interpersonal and global ideas.”

“We wanted a title that could talk about the small stuff and the big stuff at the same time. “A Healthy Earth” is actually from a line in our song “Multiverse” – and once we started throwing that around it really started to stick, it was catchy and not too wordy, and it also works aesthetically with the rest because of the repeated “ea” lettering.”

“Conceptually, ‘a healthy earth’ sparks questions in my mind – what makes a healthy earth? do we live in one? is it possible to make one? Its a question, its a call to action, it provokes thoughts.”

 

The album art for ‘A Healthy Earth’ is a rather nice photo of a model railway, and I wondered what the significance of this was:

 

“The train set was built buy Thom (our bassist) and his father some of years ago. Thom’s dad has been part of the local model train society in Westchester, NY, and the train set still resides in the basement of Thom’s parent’s house.”

 

“When I first went to Thom’s house years and years ago and I saw the train set, I immediately started taking pictures and thinking “this would be perfect for the new album (3 or so years before it was completed).”

“Last summer Thom and I went back to the house with some DSLRs and took a bunch of photos with the intention of using them as album artwork. It works really well with the “scale” theme I spoke about in the first response, and its a very beautiful model.”

 

‘In My Belly’ from the album features Indie-Pop icon Shamir, and Peter discussed what it was like collaborating with them on the track, and it turns out they were already friends.

 

“Shamir and I have gotten super close since we toured together in December of 2017, so asking them to sing was something we were eager to do.”
“It was remarkably easy since their voice is amazing and they have an incredible ear for harmony. We simply sent them the song and they sang parts in a studio with their engineer, and we took those tracks and blended them into the recording.”

 

“We knew we wanted another voice to make the middle section of the song shine and Shamir was the perfect ask. I basically just told them to “go wild” and they did!”

 

Second albums are apparently difficult to make, but definitely come with a lot of attention and hype from critics and fans alike; did Peaer go about making their second album any differently? Peter said so and I have no reason to not believe him:

 

“The first LP was very much so a snapshot of time – the band had been playing a bit in college and had these 7 or so songs ready to go, and before we all graduated and lost access to the nice studios we had at college, we decided to lay everything down.”

 

“It was much more hands-off experience. We tracked it all and then I gave it to Jeremy (not in the band yet but still engineered the whole record) and just said “okay make this sound good” and he did!”

 

“This time around we were much more intentional. We took our time with the tracking and pre-production of it all, and generally spent more collective time with the album as it was being made. Editing, re-tracking parts, adding and trying out new sounds and things in order to make the record more involved. We definitely treated it as a more substantial piece.”

 

I asked Peter what artists were inspiring the band while making ‘A Healthy Earth’:

Off the top of my head it would be the production and careful writing of (Sandy) Alex G, Pedro the Lion, the non-chalant-yet-daring nature of The Dismemberment Plan, the eclecticism of Duster’s Stratosphere, Pinback, The Lemonheads, Life Without Buildings. A lot of the same sort of artists that have always been there for me.

‘A Healthy Earth’ comes out on the 16th August, and you can pre-order it here.